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Master of Science Genetic Counseling Program

The Indiana University Genetic Counseling Program is fully accredited by the American Board of Genetic Counseling. This two-year program offers:

  • a specially designed curriculum to develop knowledge, skills and competency in genetic counseling
  • extensive clinical experience in a variety of local genetic counseling settings
  • supervising personnel who are certified by either the American Board of Medical Genetics (ABMG) or the American Board of Genetic Counseling (ABGC)
  • participation in local and regional genetics education activities
  • preparation of students to apply for active candidate status with the American Board of Genetic Counseling

Successful completion of the Indiana University Genetic Counseling Program will lead to a Master of Science degree in medical genetics.

The Genetic Counseling Professional

The American Board of Genetic Counseling describes the genetic counselor as follows:

A genetic counselor is a health care professional who is academically and clinically prepared to provide genetic counseling services to individuals and families seeking information about the occurrence, or risk of occurrence, of a genetic condition or birth defect.

The genetic counseling process involves the collection and interpretation of family, genetic, medical and psychosocial history information.  Analysis of this information, together with an understanding of genetic principles and the knowledge of current technologies, provides clients and their families with information about risk, prognosis, medical management, and diagnostic and prevention options. Information is discussed in a client-centered manner while respecting the broad spectrum of beliefs and value systems that exist in our society. The genetic counseling process ultimately facilitates informed decision-making and promotes behaviors that reduce the risk of disease

Genetic counselors practice as part of a health care team. Some examples of the types of settings genetic counselors work include: hospitals and medical centers, public health agencies, colleges and universities, diagnostic laboratories and biotechnology companies, research institutions, private practice and governmental agencies.

Further information on careers in genetic counseling is available from the National Society of Genetic Counselors at (312) 321-6834 or http://www.nsgc.org/